I build IT security programs, currently in pay media content security. Geek, photography, travel, carpentry, curling, foodie, homebrewer.
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Voting Software

14 Comments and 42 Shares
There are lots of very smart people doing fascinating work on cryptographic voting protocols. We should be funding and encouraging them, and doing all our elections with paper ballots until everyone currently working in that field has retired.
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jth
5 days ago
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XKCD Nails Secure Electronic Voting.
Saint Paul, MN, USA
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11 public comments
tante
3 days ago
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xkcd on voting software is spot-on
Oldenburg/Germany
wmorrell
3 days ago
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Hazmat suit, too. Just to be safe.
rjstegbauer
4 days ago
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Amen!! Paper... paper... paper. It's simple. It's trivial to recount. Everyone already knows how to use it. It's cheap. It's verifiable. Just... use... paper.
ianso
4 days ago
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Yes!
Brussels
ChrisDL
4 days ago
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accurate.
New York
reconbot
5 days ago
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Legitimately share this comic with anyone who represents you in government.
New York City
cheerfulscreech
5 days ago
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Truth.
skorgu
5 days ago
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100% accurate.
jsled
5 days ago
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endorsed; co-signed; it. me. &c.

(alt text: «There are lots of very smart people doing fascinating work on cryptographic voting protocols. We should be funding and encouraging them, and doing all our elections with paper ballots until everyone currently working in that field has retired.»)
South Burlington, Vermont
alt_text_bot
5 days ago
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There are lots of very smart people doing fascinating work on cryptographic voting protocols. We should be funding and encouraging them, and doing all our elections with paper ballots until everyone currently working in that field has retired.
alt_text_at_your_service
5 days ago
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There are lots of very smart people doing fascinating work on cryptographic voting protocols. We should be funding and encouraging them, and doing all our elections with paper ballots until everyone currently working in that field has retired.
srsly
5 days ago
Seconding this policy ^^

Nancy by Olivia Jaimes for Jul 7, 2018

1 Comment
Nancy by Olivia Jaimes for Jul 7, 2018
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jth
35 days ago
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19?
Saint Paul, MN, USA
SecurityFeed
17 days ago
That's what I got.
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Nancy by Olivia Jaimes for May 27, 2018

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Nancy by Olivia Jaimes for May 27, 2018
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jth
74 days ago
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Nailed it!
Saint Paul, MN, USA
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Memorable Quotes

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"Since there's no ending quote mark, everything after this is part of my quote. —Randall Munroe
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jth
210 days ago
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Wouldn't quoting anything from this post require quote marks around the quote marks in the quote?
Saint Paul, MN, USA
fancycwabs
209 days ago
Not if you only quoted the part inside the quote marks, and replaced those quote marks with ellipsis.
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2 public comments
Covarr
210 days ago
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"Luke, I am your father." -Mark Twain, to his son Luke Clemens
Moses Lake, WA
satadru
210 days ago
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This is a glorious mockery of so much of high school education.
New York, NY

Gigabutt Throughput

1 Comment

sleep is dumb

Tonight’s comic has gigabutt throughput.

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jth
270 days ago
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Except this would be megabutt throughput.
Saint Paul, MN, USA
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Hacking When it Counts: Prison Locksmithing

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In 1978, Tim Jenkin was a man living on borrowed time, and he knew it. A white South African in his late 20s, he had been born into the apartheid system of brutally enforced racial segregation. By his own admission, he didn’t even realize in his youth that apartheid existed — it was just a part of his world. But while traveling abroad in the early 1970s he began to see the injustice of the South African political system, and spurred on by what he learned, he became an activist in the anti-apartheid underground.

Intent on righting the wrongs he saw in his homeland, he embarked on a year of training in London. He returned to South Africa as a propaganda agent with the mission to spread anti-apartheid news and information to black South Africans. His group’s distribution method of choice was a leaflet bomb, which used a small explosive charge to disperse African National Congress propaganda in public places. Given that the ANC was a banned organization, and that they were setting off explosives in a public place, even though they only had a few grams of gunpowder, it was inevitable that Jenkin would be caught. He and cohort Steven Lee were arrested, tried and convicted;  Jenkin was sentenced to 12 years in prison, while Lee got eight.

The Keymaster

Unwilling to spend his 30s as a political prisoner, Jenkin began to think his way out of the problem. Housed in the maximum security Pretoria Prison, Jenkin found the first weakness in the system he could exploit: he was housed with only nine other political prisoners, all of whom had the same ideological background. This eliminated the possibility of a jailhouse snitch and allowed him to enlist support as needed. The other advantage was that he and the other inmates were required to labor in the prison carpentry shop, which gave him access to tools and materials.

Another weakness Jenkin exploited was the one offered by all locks: all the information needed to defeat it is encoded in the lock mechanism. Without any locksmithing experience to guide him, Jenkin relied on observation and experiment to determine the configuration of the wards inside the lock on his cell door. Using a piece of paper and a small knife, he took impressions of the lock’s innards and fashioned a wooden key in the carpentry shop. After some adjustments with a file, the key worked on the inner door of his cell, and a similar key rigged to a broomstick served to open his outer door, which was keyed on the outside. Once free from his cell, Jenkin freed Lee, and together they explored the jail, looking for more weaknesses.

Ten Doors to Freedom

They found a total of eight more locked doors between them and freedom, and with a third accomplice, Alex Moumbaris, they spent months systematically probing each door for weaknesses. They worked after lockdown when they knew the guard was on his rounds. Some doors had the same keys as others, but some needed new keys fashioned. Some keys were fashioned from wood, and some used soldered wires. In one particularly daring hack, Jenkin disassembled a lock, filed down the internal levers so that any key would work, and reassembled the lock before being discovered.

Tim Jenkin with his key. Source: The Daily Mail

Finally, after months of meticulous planning, probing, and fabricating, Jenkin, Lee, and Moumbaris began their escape. Armed with their keys, civilian clothes pilfered from incoming inmates, and with cigar tubes full of carefully hoarded money stashed in the natural place for a cigar full of contraband, the threesome breached the first nine doors. The final door would not yield to picking attempts, so Moumbaris brute-forced the door with a chisel and a screwdriver, much to the dismay of Jenkin, who preferred to leave no trace of their departure. Once they cleared the tenth door, they dissolved into the streets of Pretoria as anonymous civilians. They walked over the border into Swaziland and eventually made contact with the ANC for help getting as far from South Africa as possible.

The tale of Jenkin’s daring prison locksmithing and his escape with Lee and Moumbaris is a remarkable tale of ingenuity and bravery in the face of poor odds of success and a high penalty for failure. Jenkin recently gave a talk at a lockpicking conference in the Netherlands, a video of which is below. It’s a long video but it’s well worth watching, not only for the first-hand details of the expedient locksmithing but for the social engineering that made the escape a success.

There’s also a dramatized version of the escape from the National Geographic channel, which seems to hew closely to Jenkin’s first-hand account. And watch for a major motion picture on the escape starring Daniel Radcliffe and Sam Neil, set to start filming next year. Hollywood may well give short shrift to the hacks Jenkin pulled off when it counted, so to see him talk about his brief career as a prison locksmith in detail to a group of like-minded folks is a real treat.

Many thanks to [Jan-Willem Markus] for the tip.


Filed under: Featured, History, lockpicking hacks, Original Art





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jth
276 days ago
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Saint Paul, MN, USA
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